0216 – 9-11 Series: Where Were You?

Our community is a varied one.  There are listeners that are local, state wide, national and even world wide.  We span ages from young adult to “old timers.”  Men and women, many races, religions, creeds, etc.  Many differences.  However, we all come here to learn about leading safer lives.  That is our common bond.  September 11, 2001, without a doubt, is one of the events that cast me as a person and drove me in the direction of preparedness, security and safety.  That may not be the case with everyone listening today.  Maybe, you were too young to understand.  Maybe you are from another part of the world and just didn’t relate.  Or maybe you have a vast amount of experience with terror that the typical American can’t begin to understand.  Whatever your background, I feel strongly that there are lessons to be learned from the horrific events of 9/11.  Since this September 11 will mark 10 years since the attacks, it is my intent to dedicate the next 10 episodes to that end.

Admin:

Sponsor of the day:

Survival Gear Bags

Warrior Summit

#SSAPcast

Where Were You?

Every year Harvard releases a reminder to its professors to help them understand the students that they are dealing with.  A portion of the information reminds those educators that their students have never used a cassette tape, VHS tape, been in a kitchen without a microwave, you get the idea.  As I was reflecting on the 10th anniversary of 9/11  I realized that we are starting to get to the point where many of our young people don’t remember.

  • 18 year olds were probably in second grad
  • too young to really remember
  • sheltered from truth
  • not enough experience to make sense of it
I come from a “Never Forget” mentality, but never forget is an impossibility to someone who “Never Knew.”
  • We have a responsibility to educate young people so that they can understand to some degree what is going on.
  • We can’t leave that up to schools.
    • I come from an education background so don’t be too angry with me, but our system is not well know for turning out folks who know and understand history.
    • I can’t say I am a fan of many of the lessons that are out there for 9/11 for teachers to use.
    • Tolerance isn’t the most important lesson I would take out of that day.

Never Forget! to share

Since the images of that day are burned into my mind, I will “Never Forget!,” but keep in mind I also make an active decision to “Always Remember!”  I fell lucky that I have that opportunity.  My children do not.  They were not around.  It is my job to teach them.  Probably the best way to do that is to share my story and the stories of those that were around.  Learning through stories is a human tradition.  So take the time to tell your story.  I would love to hear it.  Use the comments for the blog, email, facebook, or twitter.

My Story of 9/11

My story Probably isn’t very different from the stories of most Americans.  The day was a glorious one as far as the weather is concerned, but like most folks, I was at work.  Teaching math.  Easy stuff, the start of the year, mostly review.  It was still the honeymoon period.

  • About 8:55, I got a call from the office to head to the Media Center as someone needed help with the cable.
  • When I got there it was buzzing with all available adults
  • Got the cable hooked up as details were coming to me from the staff about the horrible accident.
  • Finished hooking the cable up at 9:02
  • Watched the second plane hit the tower
  • Thought it was a replay
  • Realized this wasn’t an accident
  • Back to class, mum was the word.  6th graders.
  • Massive distraction
    • I knew something was going on
    • Couldn’t continue to gather info
    • Couldn’t discuss
    • In fact had to just push it away
    • Wasn’t long before parents came for their kids
    • By the end of the day there were just a handful of kids.

After Work

  • CCW
  • Was not an unprepared guy
  • Rifles
  • Ammo
  • Comms

Next Day

  • Changes
  • Stay the Same
  • Dealing with the kids
  • Lip Service

The Drive to Prepare

I remember the speculation that followed 9/11 about what was next.  Airlines grounded, games canceled, money stopped flowing and  life was simply put on hold by our nation in many ways.  It was immobilizing to most people to mentally grasp the concept that they could be in the middle of an attack at the mall, the game, the school.  Nothing had changed except that Americans were forced to swallow a pill that woke them up to the reality around them.
For me, my currently held beliefs were simply proven to be true.  It is our responsibility to be prepared to take care of ourselves.  Flood, tornado, job loss, violent crime, terrorism.  It didn’t matter.  As united as our nation was, it had never been more apparent that we the people had to get ready.

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *